From the Editor’s Keyboard

SLPP: Giving up dealing with political fears is not an option

11 January 2017 at 23:52 | 1443 views

Commentary

By Essa Thaim Krugba, PV Special Correspondent, Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Leaders in the Sierra Leone People’s Party are running around with political fears, nervousness, and other domestic problems that have had the best of them to the point of not knowing where to turn for help.

At some point in time, they feel totally helpless as they struggle each day to survive the political nightmare. What should these political vampires do to salvage such a situation? As a layman, there were times that my political fears had the best of me. Through these experiences, there is one thing that I learned: You can’t hide or run away from your fears. Trust me!

In the light of some other cases, taking drugs, drinking Omole or other addictions will not take away your problems and political jumpiness. In the short run, they will make you feel better but in the long run these addictions will only make things worse if you don’t trust yourself.

So what do you do to make the SLPP’s political struggle, leadership struggle and political fears go away? Well, since these leaders can’t run away or do not want to run away from their political fears, the best solution is to tackle their political jumpiness on time, because no matter how strong they may be, SLPP will still have problems. In other words, the key is to be smart in how they try to manage these fears.

Here are some few ways to manage your persistent fears and anxieties:

- Make sure you take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about the APC or how the SLPP will get through the rest of the week or the coming 2018 general elections, try to focus on today. Each day can provide you with different opportunities to learn new things which include learning how to deal with your problems.

- Focus on the present and stop trying to predict what may happen next week. Next week will take care of itself!

- Meticulously, the SLPP leadership should have to learn on how to manage their political fearful thoughts that may be difficult to manage. In other words, when experiencing such a negative thoughts, read some positive statements and affirmations that will help lift your spirits and make you feel better. Remember that your fearful thoughts may be exaggerated so balance these thoughts with realistic thinking and common sense.

Moreover, the Pao-o-pa or the Kapen factions must take advantage of the help that is available around them. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your fears and anxieties. SLPP will be able to provide others with additional advice and insights on how to deal with the humongous current political problem. By talking to a professional (psychologist or psychiatrist), a person will be helping themselves in the long run because they will become better in dealing with their problems in the future. Managing your fears, nervousness and anxieties takes practice. The more you practice, the better you will become.

When managing your political fears, nervousness and anxieties do not try to tackle everything at once. The best solution is to break your fears or problems into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success. Managing your fears, nervousness and anxieties will take away some of your political problems but not eliminate them totally. In other words, trying to avoid political confrontations regarding such problems will do you nothing good in getting rid of your fears, jumpiness and anxieties. But sooner or later, you will have to confront your fears and anxieties again.

Remember that all you can do is to do your best each day, hope for the best, and take things in stride. Patience, persistence, education, and being committed in trying to solve your problem will go a long way in fixing your problems.

A rowdy crowd of SLPP supporters in front of the main Law Courts in Freetown earlier this week. This crowd later became very violent and shots were fired injuring at least one person. Two factions, Paopa and AAA (aye, aye, aye) from the country’s main opposition party, the Sierra Leone People’s Party, were at each other’s throat, struggling for legitimacy and dominance. Police had to intervene to disperse them.

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