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Sierra Leone: Draft Capacity Building Strategy

4 November 2005 at 20:58 | 508 views

Programme Framework

October 2005

Table of Contents

List of Acronyms 3
Abstract 5

Introduction 6
1. Overview of the Capacity Challenges the Programme Addresses 7
1.1 Coordination, Monitoring, Evaluation and Resource Mobilization 7
1.2 Policy Development, Service Delivery and Decentralization 8
1.3 Institutional Environment 11
1.4 Civil Society and Private Sector 14

2. The Strategy 15
2.1 Need for a Comprehensive Framework 15
2.2 Guiding Principles 16
2.3 Goals & Objectives 17
2.4 Strategic Thrust and Basic Premise 17
2.5 Programme Components 17

3. Management Arrangements 19
3.1 Implementation Arrangements 19
3.2 Monitoring & Reporting 20

4. Indicative Budget 21

Annex 1: Implementation Matrix- Time Frame 22
Annex 2: Project Matrix on Strengthening Institutional Framework for 23
Coordination, Monitoring and Resource Mobilization
Annex 3: Project Matrix on Strengthening Policy Development, support 26
to Service Delivery and Decentralization
Annex 4: Project Matrix on Improving Institutional Environment, Capacity 29
Retention and Sustainability
Annex 5: Project Matrix on Strengthening civil society and private sector 31
Annex 6: Matrix of Training, Staffing/Manpower, Technical Assistance 33
and Other Needs Identified in Key MDAs

Appendix I: Draft Memorandum of Understanding among a Group of 37
Development Partners on Cooperation for Support to the
Capacity Building Programme
Appendix II: Draft Terms of Reference for the Basket Steering Committee 43
Appendix III: Draft Terms of Reference for the Programme Management Unit (PMU) 45
Appendix IV: Draft Terms of Reference of Staff of Programme Unit

List of Acronyms

ACBF African Capacity Building Foundation
AFRISAT
CHO Community Health Officer
CSM/SL Civil Society Movement/Sierra Leone
CSO Civil Society Organizations
DACO Development Aid Coordination Office
DECSEC Decentralization Secretariat
DEPAC Development Partnership Committee (Sierra Leone)
DEVINFO Development Information
DFID Department for International Development (UK)
DMO District Medical Officer
ECOWAS Economic Community of West African States
ENCISS Enhancing the Interaction and Interface between Civil Society and the State to improve poor people’s lives
ESO Establishment Secretary’s Office
EU European Union
FAO Food and Agricultural Organization
GIMPA Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration
GIS Geographic Information System
GOSL Government of Sierra Leone
GRS Governance Reform Secretariat
HDI Human Development Index
HRMO Human Resources Management Office
HQ Headquarters
ICT Information Communication Technology
IMC Inter-Ministerial Committee
IMF International Monetary Fund
IOM International Organization for Migration
IPAM Institute for Public Administration and Management (University of Sierra Leone)
IRCBP Institutional Reform and Capacity Building Project
IT Information Technology
LC Local Councils
MAFFS Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security
MCH Maternal and Child Health
MEST Ministry of Education, Science and Technology
MDAs Ministries, Departments and Agencies
MICS Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey
MIDA Migration for Development in Africa
MIS Management Information Systems
MFMR Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources
MODEP Ministry of Planning and Economic Development
MOF Ministry of Finance
MOHS Ministry of Health and Sanitation
MoU Memorandum of Understanding
MPPA/OP Ministry of Presidential and Public Affairs/Office of the President
MTI Ministry of Trade and Industry
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MTEF Medium Term Expenditure Framework
NASSIT National Social Security and Insurance Trust
NEX National Execution (UNDP)
NGO Non Governmental Organization
NRA National Revenue Authority
NTC National Technical Committee
O & G Obstetrician - gynaecologists
PEMSD Planning, Evaluation, Monitoring and Statistics Division (MAFFS)
PETS Public Expenditure Tracking System
PH Public Health
PHC Primary Health Care
PMU Project Management Unit
PRSP Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper
PIU Programme Implementation Unit
SES Senior Executive Service
SLEDIC Sierra Leone Export Development and Investment Corporation
SLIBA Sierra Leone Indigenous Business Association
SL-PRSP Sierra Leone Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper
SLSB Sierra Leone Standards Bureau
SME Small and Medium Enterprises
SRN State Registered Nurse
SSL Statistics Sierra Leone
TOKTEN Transfer of Knowledge through Expatriate Nationals
ToR Terms of Reference
UN United Nations
UNCT United Nations Country Team
UNDP United Nations Development Programme
UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund
UNMANSIL United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone
UNV United Nations Volunteers
VSAT Very Small Aperture Terminal
VVF Vesico Vaginal Fistulae
WAIFEM West African Institute for Financial and Economic Management
WATSAN Water and Sanitation
WB World Bank
WTO World Trade Organization
WHO World Health Organization

Abstract

This programme aims to build capacities to implement the SL-PRSP. It focuses on actions to enhance the capacities of key ministries, departments and agencies (MDAs), Local governments and other stakeholders (civil society, private sector and Parliament) in order that the outcomes, impacts and goals of the PRSP can be fully met and to strengthen synergies in capacity building efforts.

The specific objectives are to:
1. Facilitate timely and full implementation of the PRSP;
2. Ensure coherent support to capacity building efforts by government and its partners; and
3. Strengthen national ownership and sustainability of capacity building in the public service.

In line with the goal and objectives outlined above, the progamme will intervene in four key areas, namely:
· Strengthen the PRSP institutional framework for coordination, monitoring and resource mobilization;
· Improve capacity and key competencies of MDAs for policy development, service delivery and support to decentralization, with priority focus on the key MDAs;
· Support improvement of the institutional environment through a comprehensive public service reform to ensure capacity retention and sustainability; and
· Enhance capacities of civil society organizations and the private sector to play a more effective role in PRSP implementation.

The end result is to have:
¨ Targets of PRSP met in a timely manner;
¨ Better skilled and oriented cadres;
¨ Enhancement of management cadres as change leaders in the civil service;
¨ Improved capacities to plan, absorb and utilize resources; and
¨ Responsive and effective public institutions through a comprehensive public service reform.

INTRODUCTION

Sierra Leone has experienced decades of economic decline, starting in the mid-1980s and an 11-year brutal armed conflict that saw the breakdown of civil and political authority, widespread destruction of economic and social infrastructure and untold human suffering - over 20,000 dead, countless wounded and/or maimed and millions displaced. With the strong support of the international community (UN, Bilateral and Multilateral donors, International Financial Institutions, NGOs, etc) a comprehensive recovery strategy has been implemented which has restored stability and rebuilt basic social and economic infrastructure destroyed by war and years of economic decline. Most of the war-affected populations have now been successfully reintegrated into their villages and communities and state authority re-established throughout the country. A Local Government Act was enacted in 2004 and elections for local councils held the same year. The country is at a crucial turning point in the transition from post-conflict recovery to longer-term economic and social development. Although many challenges still lie ahead, the foundation for peace and stability has been laid. The formulation and adoption of a Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (the SL- PRSP) marks an important step on the road to long-term social and economic development of the country.

Poverty in Sierra Leone is endemic and pervasive with about 70% of the population below the poverty line; i.e. expenditures less than 1US$ a day. The cumulative effect of years of economic decline, bad governance and the war is to place Sierra Leone near the bottom of the ranking for Human Development Index (HDI) - ahead of only Niger in 2005. The human development and social indicators, including illiteracy, primary school enrolments, life expectancy, maternal deaths, malnutrition, and child mortality rates, rank among the worst in the world. The SL-PRSP aims to address the deep and pervasive poverty in a comprehensive manner, taking into account the country’s war-torn history.

Weak institutional capacities in the public sector and civil society are a major challenge for implementation of the SL-PRSP. The capacities of state institutions in Sierra Leone have been in serious decline for decades and were further considerably degraded as a result of the 11-year civil war. Shortage of personnel, gaps in expertise and skills and poor motivation are pervasive in state institutions, civil society and the business sector. As a consequence of the bottlenecks arising from a poorly functioning public service, post-conflict reconstruction relied heavily on institutional arrangements that by-passed state structures to ensure speedy and effective implementation of planned activities. The changed situation/context now calls into question many of these operational modalities - programme implementation units (PIUs), commissions and other specialized entities created to deliver assistance. While effective in the short-term, they have tended to distort the incentive structure in the public service and must now be progressively phased out and be replaced by longer-term support that strengthens the ability of state institutions to formulate and coordinate policies and deliver services on a sustained basis. This issue is central to the capacity building challenge in Sierra Leone and implementing the PRSP.

This paper presents a comprehensive programme to build capacities required to implement the PRSP. The programme builds upon prior and ongoing assistance provided by Government and Sierra Leone’s development partners, and seeks to ensure that the outcomes, impacts and goals of the PRSP are fully met. By offering a framework for capacity building, the programme aims to strengthen synergies and reduce duplication of efforts. Institutional issues that shape the retention of capacities are addressed in order to ensure that capacity building efforts are sustainable and demand-led.
The paper is structured as follows: Section I provides an overview of the capacity challenges the programme will address. This is followed in Section II by the strategy to address the challenges, including the programme objectives and main outcomes. The management arrangements and budget are in Sections III and IV respectively.

1. Overview of the Main Capacity Challenges the Programme Addresses

The main capacity gaps the programme is designed to address are grouped under the following clusters:
· Coordination, monitoring, evaluation and resource mobilization;
· Policy development, strategic planning, and support to service delivery and decentralization.
· The institutional environment and its impact on capacity creation and retention in the public service; and
· Civil society and private sector.

1.1 Coordination, Monitoring, Evaluation and Resource Mobilization

Institutional Framework for Coordination

In keeping with its participatory and inclusive principles, implementation of the PRSP will involve a diverse number of actors/stakeholders - at national, district, chiefdom and ward levels, and various stakeholders (government entities, civil society and donors). A robust institutional framework to coordinate and direct actions is therefore vital to success. At present, the institutional architecture to coordinate implementation consists of the Development Aid Coordination Office (DACO) tasked with performing the functions of a PRSP secretariat, and the Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) and the National Technical Committee to provide policy, strategic and technical guidance. The aim is to establish a permanent coordination structure embedded within government institutions to coordinate implementation. The institutional anchor to coordinate the PRSP will be decided based on the outcome of the functional reviews of MODEP and MOF. In the interim, the mandate of the Development Aid Coordination Office has been expanded to perform this coordination function in addition to its aid coordination role. Given the many challenges to be faced during this initial phase of implementation, DACO will require significant strengthening in order to carry out its new functions. The competencies built within DACO in the interim phase can subsequently be transferred to the host institution for the PRSP. DACO however is understaffed and it currently lacks the expertise to undertake the functions of the PRSP secretariat, including overseeing monitoring and evaluation of the PRSP and its staff would require additional training to be effective. The functional linkages of DACO with other initiatives also need to be strengthened. For example, improved links with the decentralization secretariat are necessary to ensure proper alignment between the funding of the PRSP activities at district level with arrangements for financing Local Councils. The Inter Ministerial Committee (IMC) and the National Technical Committee (NTC) will require further strengthening as well.

Monitoring and Evaluating the PRSP

Effective monitoring and evaluation of the PRSP entails capacity to generate and effectively use high-quality and timely data to track progress and capacity for participatory M&E involving communities, civil society and the public at large. While a positive step has been taken with the development of an M&E framework, important and significant capacity gaps exist for M&E at all levels and among the key actors. An important challenge and priority is to establish the baseline conditions against which to measure progress.

Statistics Sierra Leone (SSL) and the PETS taskforce are key to a poverty monitoring framework. SSL has improved institutional capacities for data collection and analysis through the Household Income and Expenditure Survey, the Core Welfare Indicator Survey, DEVINFO, and other routine surveys (e.g. UNICEF-sponsored Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - MICS-3 survey) which makes it a lead institution for a comprehensive poverty monitoring architecture. SSL can help harmonize data collection protocols and definitions, ensure data quality and reliability and provide guidance and training in data collection and survey methods and data analysis for MDA staff, local council personnel and other stakeholders. Yet SSL continues to lose staff to other organizations (e.g. NASSIT, NRA) due to non-competitive salaries. The gap left behind is difficult to fill as most of the skills are acquired by on-the-job training which newly recruited staff do not have.

Within MDAs, greater efforts are also needed to establish and/or rehabilitate management information systems and upgrade the skills of relevant staff to undertake M&E. Centralized planning and decision-making have in the past marginalized communities and civil society in public policy processes. Support will therefore be needed to ensure that civil society and communities have the capacities to play their role in M&E. Parliament’s oversight role also needs strengthening.

Resource Mobilization

The ability of government to mobilize, absorb and effectively use resources is a critical factor for success. According to estimates, the PRSP would require additional expenditure of approximately US$ 200-300 million above the MTEF. The current low institutional absorption capacity will lead to slow and ineffective implementation of the PRSP. An improved resource mobilization capacity for Local Councils is also essential; a pilot UNDP programme (Agricultural Business Units) is aimed at strengthening such capacities. Further support is needed to expand the resource mobilization capacities of local councils.

1.2 Policy Development and Coordination, Strategic Planning, Service Delivery and Support to Decentralization.

The main tasks of MDAs in the implementation of the PRSP are to develop effective policies, and to support service delivery and decentralization. These roles have not fully matured yet and substantial support would be needed to accomplish these tasks and facilitate institutional transformation. These capacities need to be enhanced as a matter of urgency but be closely coordinated with and take into account the more comprehensive public service reform process underway.
Support to Service Delivery

With respect to support to service delivery, a major problem is the inadequate number of staff in both the professional and other categories and lack of expertise in critical areas. Poor remuneration for civil servants combined with imbalances in incentives created by donor-supported implementation units, NGO recruitments and other factors have led to severe loss of personnel in MDAs. For example, MODEP reports that it has lost about 70% of its professional staff to projects, NGOs and other higher paying organizations. In MOHS, there are only 66 medical officers while 300 are needed . The lack of personnel is further compounded by poorly qualified staff particularly at the middle levels responsible for output/deliverables. Existing staff are also not effectively utilized due to lack of clear strategies in MDAS and poor staff supervision. Staff have limited opportunity to upgrade their skills and many have not received training in more than a decade. Transfer of skills from expatriate technical staff to nationals is also limited. Training budgets for MDAs are so small as to have only symbolic value. Staff promoted to new positions (e.g. from technical to managerial positions) often do not get trained to assume their new functions. Training is uncoordinated, haphazard and based more on personal than institutional needs. There is no training policy in place although a draft policy was recently developed. The capacity of local institutions to provide training also needs attention as they may also be handicapped by lack of facilities and adequately trained instructors. In the long-term the existing technical expertise gaps in key MDAs should be addressed through reform of the tertiary education institutions so that they produce people with the right skills and orientation to support development of the country. Once trained, there should be a speedy and effective process to absorb them into a public service with the right structures and incentives. Plans to establish a Distance Learning Centre by the World Bank will help address some of the training needs.

Inadequate manpower planning capacity in MDAs has aggravated the situation. This needs to be strengthened to ensure that MDAS have the expertise and minimum core capacities to discharge their functions and ensure effective and efficient service delivery . An additional problem is the poor matching of staff to jobs - promotion is based on seniority rather than competence - which weakens staff supervision and monitoring of performance. Furthermore, in many MDAs, reference materials (technical publications, etc) for staff to consult are unavailable or outdated. Human resources management units need to be set up in MDAs to strengthen staff development and career planning. Even when qualified staff are available, obsolete and cumbersome procedures in the Establishment secretary’s office (ESO) when recruiting personnel constitutes a bottleneck. The government is therefore faced with a paradoxical situation of high rates of vacancies in the civil service and high rates of unemployment, including for many trained nationals within the country. Efforts to transform the Establishment secretary’s Office (ESO) into a modern human resources office with support from DFID is a significant step forward.

Assistance provided by donors is uneven across MDAs. While some benefit from multi-donor assistance, a few of the key ones receive less attention. The result is that capacities in some MDAs have been degraded to the extent that their ability to perform core functions is weakened. The outreach capacity of MDAs and capacity to deliver services is cause for concern. Serious consideration therefore needs to be given to providing integrated institutional support to rebuild capacities of some of the MDAs. The MAFFS is a prime candidate for such institutional support.

The scale and scope of the personnel and expertise gaps in Sierra Leone are of a magnitude that requires a multi-pronged and comprehensive short and long-term strategy to address them. The elements of a short-term strategy would include the following:
Þ new recruitments to fill critical posts (taking into account decentralization, the personnel verification exercise and the ceiling on the government’s wage bill );
Þ short-term and on-the-job training to enable staff currently in post undertake their functions better and/or perform new higher functions (e.g. in the medical field experience from Mozambique and elsewhere show that many routine surgical procedures can be performed by specially trained nurses);
Þ Short-term gap-filling strategies that would include:
· a UNV programme (TOKTEN - Transfer of Knowledge through Expatriate Nationals) to address the insufficient number of middle levels cadres responsible for delivery/outputs - including tapping Sierra Leone nationals in the Diaspora on short to medium-term contractual basis.
· A MIDA (Migration for Development in Africa) programme designed to bring in highly skilled Sierra Leone nationals in Diaspora; and
· Expanding the current technical cooperation agreements between GOSL and other governments;
Þ Long-term training in-country and within the region; and
Þ Carefully targeted Technical Assistance - both short and medium-term.

To be effective, this strategy must be underpinned by comprehensive public service reform, particularly the elements dealing with incentives and motivation (e.g. the government’s policy to establish a Senior Executive Service), transformation of the ESO into an HRMO, re-definition of core functions of MDAs (i.e. implementing outcomes of the functional reviews) and adoption of a training and human resource development policy.

Policy Development and Strategic Planning

In addition to gross shortages of personnel to support service delivery, many MDAs also suffer from lack of expertise to perform key functions such as policy development and coordination, and strategic planning . For example, the directorate of planning in MEST has nearly all its professional positions unfilled, and it is currently headed by a staff in an acting capacity. As a result the ability to undertake core functions such as educational policy development and planning are weak, a situation worsened by poor statistics and data collection and analysis. Similarly, the Planning, Evaluation, Monitoring and Statistical Division (PEMSD) of MAFFS is weak. The division is unable to design agricultural policy as it lacks the requisite expertise. A related problem is weakness in data gathering, analysis and presentation for evidence-based policy formulation and review. MODEP currently lacks a strategic planning capability. Competencies to integrate gender in policy formulation, programme development, implementation and monitoring are also weak across MDAs.
The weakness in planning capacities of MDAs was made evident during PRSP preparation when many reportedly had difficulty in identifying and prioritizing actions leading to a delay in the formulation of the PRSP. The African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) has recently developed a regional manpower training programme for the Mano River Union countries (Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea) which will support training on policy and development management for government staff in the three countries. This project once fully implemented will make a significant contribution to capacity building in Sierra Leone.

Another area of concern is capacities for financial management and budgeting, including budget and expenditure management and control, particularly in the context of the MTEF. The expertise to discharge these functions needs to be strengthened to improve resource planning, resource mobilization and utilization.

Support to Decentralization

Lack of staff, expertise and appropriate skills to support decentralization must be urgently addressed. The multi-donor decentralization project (IRCBP) is undertaking significant capacity building for the newly elected Local Councils but the ability of central government institutions to support this process is weak. UNDP is assisting a few ministries (MAFFS, MOHS and Local Government) to support the decentralization of functions and preparing devolution plans and has placed staff within ministries for this purpose. At the central level, poor capacities for policy oversight, monitoring and reporting on the devolution process and subsequently on assessing the impact of the PRSP are evident. In addition, the MDAs are also currently unable to provide training support to sector specialists in Local Councils, help them interpret new policy directives, set national standards to guide programme interventions, and prepare councils to implement the PRSP and monitor impact. MAFFS and MOHS have completed plans to devolve functions to local councils and MEST will be following suit. The training provided to local councils by Decentralization secretariat (DECSEC) should therefore be complemented by training that targets technical staff under local council jurisdiction. The goal is to have services qualitatively better as a result of decentralization.

1.3 Institutional Environment to Create, Nurture and Retain Capacities

A poor institutional environment is the main cause for the lack of skilled personnel and the poor performance and lack of motivation in most MDAs. The public service in Sierra Leone is dysfunctional and unable in its current form to provide strategic direction for implementation of key government macroeconomic and social policies, including the PRSP. Early and more recent concept papers on reforming the public service since the resumption of power by the government in 1996 include the National Strategy for Good Governance (1997) and Strategic Options for Public Sector Reform (2005).

Government’s Policy to Establish a Senior Executive Service

The genesis of the current situation predates the war years. The Report of The Presidential Commission on The Restructuring of The Senior Civil Service provides a historical perspective of a service that performs poorly, is not based on a merit system and uses corruption as a survival strategy. This sorry state of affairs is attributable to erosion in real wages, political interference, impact of structural adjustment programmes and the 11 year civil war. The government’s stated rationale for the SES is that an efficient management core (covering civil service grades 11-14) should be created to provide leadership and the motive force to restructure and revitalize the civil service. From the government’s view, the SES would:
· Pay competitive wages to attract highly skilled and motivated staff for the higher grades (11-14) of the civil service;
· Open the civil service to outside expertise, infuse it with new blood and introduce the element of competition into the system. The mechanism of lateral entry into the service is seen as an omnibus instrument to attract Sierra Leone nationals in the Diaspora, and those from academia, the private sector, as well as many professionals currently on contract in PIUs;
· Institute a process of accelerated promotion for so-called “high-flyers” to move to the top echelons of the service;
· Ensure that the process of entry into, retention, promotion and re-numeration would be based on total competition and would thus remove the element of corruption and political interference;
· Have as an underlying principle of the service, the evaluation of performance wherein good performance is rewarded and persistent bad performance sanctioned by removal;
· Encourage and act as an incentive to lower and middle level civil servants (especially the so-called “feeder grades” of 8-10); and
· Enhance government’s revenue generation capacity in addition to the improved service delivery functions of state institutions. Government is experimenting with new institutional models based on streamlining agencies and this has significantly enhanced its revenue generating capacity - e.g. National Revenue Authority.

The end result sought is a leaner civil service (since it is expected that a lot of the civil servants may move to decentralized structures) with significantly improved performance.

Other Public Service Reform Initiatives

The government’s SES policy is only one of many other initiatives underway which include the DFID supported Governance and Civil Service Reform Project, Phase II (2004-2007) comprising of organizational reviews of key MDAs, preparation of a public service reform strategy, review of pay and grading system, records management improvements (personnel records) and transformation of the Establishment Secretary’s Office (ESO) into a modern Human Resources Management Office. The various strands in public service reform in Sierra Leone constitute a good basis for formulating a comprehensive agenda to revitalize public sector institutions. However, the initiatives have so far been parallel. Government has therefore identified the need to prepare a comprehensive Public Service Reform Strategy that would link the various components of reform.

Progress on public service reform has been slow because of the complexity of the situation. While there is substantial agreement on what is wrong there is not yet sufficient consensus on how to fix it. The government sees the SES as the starting point and main policy for capacity building while some donors have so far been reluctant to implement the SES. There is an urgent need to agree a set of practical and achievable actions between government and development partners through a process that is inclusive, drawing on elements of the different proposals.

The SES policy must been seen as a first stage of a comprehensive public service reform that would integrate key recommendations of the functional reviews and other processes. Positive developments have taken place recently and several ideas are being discussed on the way forward. Creating and retaining capacities should be a government-led and nationally driven, and must address the overall incentive structure, not just salary related ones; even strong institutions will collapse under poor governance situation. This programme will contribute to the reform process by strengthening government capacity to provide leadership for public service reform.

Programme Implementation Units

Any public service reform process in Sierra Leone must address the reality of a large number of project implementation units (PIUs) and similar institutional models created by donors. At present there are 104 contract officers at a cost of approximately US$ 3 million annually - the largest numbers are in MOF (24) and MOHS (22). These structures which by-pass the national mechanisms raise a number of questions:
· Are they a necessary evil or institutional models that have outlived their usefulness?
· Has the reliance on PIUs created a “comfort zone” for donors and hence a reluctance to move to institutional models more directly under government control?
· Are they now an impediment to creating, nurturing and retaining capacities?
· Are the higher salaries of staff in these entities acting as a further reason for declining motivation in the civil service?
· Are the entities prolonging the inability of state institutions to function effectively?

Parallel implementation structures are not limited to Sierra Leone and have long been utilized to fill technical skills gap in management of development assistance programmes. They are a mixed blessing, although they continue to be used widely. The consensus is that although enclave projects have improved performance in a significant way, these gains need to be embedded within the normal operations/functions of state institutions, and not created as time-bound project support activities. A World Bank lessons learnt exercise on PIUs proposes the following formula for the establishment of PIUs :
· Use them only in exceptional circumstances and build in a commitment to a monitorable phase-out plan;
· They should contribute to the rapid implementation of projects; and
· They should be integral parts of line ministries rather as independent units operating autonomously.

In the present context doing away with PIUs in the short-term without putting in place an effective public service could be detrimental. However, prolonging their existence would lead to unacceptable delays in building effective state institutions. The idea of absorbing and integrating qualified staff currently in PIUs into state institutions as proposed under the SES would significantly contribute to capacity building and retention in the public service.

Access to ICT

A cross-cutting concern is the poor ICT base in most MDAs. In most government institutions, access to internet and other knowledge management tools is limited. As a result, many MDAs operate in an environment reminiscent of the 1980s rather than as modern institutions. Poor communication within and between MDAs and partners is an obstacle to the exercise by MDAs of new functions relating to policy coordination, monitoring and regulation. A training needs assessment conducted in March 2005 showed that a high priority was accorded to information and computer training .

1.4 Civil Society Organizations and the Private Sector

The PRSP process in Sierra Leone affords Civil Society Organizations (CSO) an improved opportunity to contribute to a landmark policy framework in partnership with government and donors. It improves substantially the access of civil society organizations to public policy making in the country. This opportunity must be capitalized upon by CSOs.

The PRSP has moved into the more crucial phase of implementation as policy priorities are translated into concrete activities, resources allocated and detailed plans are designed and implemented at the local level. This is the most challenging part and requires effective participation of CSOs. It also calls for capacities different from those required of the CSOs during the preparatory phase.

However, many weaknesses prevent civil society in Sierra Leone from playing a more meaningful role. A 2003 DFID study notes that “the organizational, technical, strategic and advocacy capacity of civil society is weak. Civil society is fragmented and there is limited horizontal accountability or transparency between Freetown - based organizations and the rural poor. Since the influx of donor funds, “elite” social justice and service delivery organizations have mushroomed responding to the donor agendas. Many carry out activities in rural areas, but the rural poor are seen as their “beneficiaries”, not constituencies whom they should consult and represent. Those based in Freetown have greater access to GOSL, but have limited capacity for influencing policy. The rural community and socially embedded organizations are generally excluded and lack voice.” The main areas that require attention including the following:
· Capacity to continue to engage in policy discussions on the PRSP not only within the structures set up to coordinate implementation at the national level but also to dialogue with the districts and communities and ensure these outcomes are fed to national level processes;
· Enhanced capacity for independent research and policy analysis for an informed and constructive engagement;
· Reinforced capacities for advocacy: inevitably, implementation of the PRSP requires hard choices on priorities. CSOs must have an improved ability for advocacy and lobbying;
· Strengthening capacities for civic engagement, especially targeting Ward committees and women’s groups and members of such committees;
· Monitoring all phases of implementation, but especially on: (i) lobbying for activities that would have the greatest impact on the poor; (ii) budgets: budget formulation , budget debate/analysis, skills for analyzing budgets, etc), and monitoring budget implementation (monitoring budget inputs, outputs and outcomes)

ENCISS (Enhancing the Interaction and Interface Between Civil Society and the State to Improve Poor Peoples Lives), a five year DFID supported programme designed to strengthen public engagement on two key policy frameworks - the PRSP and decentralization - addresses many of these challenges. The capacity building programme will complement ENCISS by focusing on strengthening coordination and outreach capacities and strengthening community-based organizations. The ability and capacities of the poor, especially women, to lift themselves through individual initiative and enterprise is the foundation of poverty reduction efforts and must be strengthened. Efforts to enhance the access of individuals and the poor to information to claim their rights are therefore of vital importance. In this context, the programme will provide assistance to networks especially for women.

An expanding economy through the efforts of the private sector is key to reducing poverty, growing jobs and enhancing incomes. The role of the private sector in implementing the PRSP is therefore of vital importance as government can only be a facilitator in job creation and income generation. Under current conditions, the government’s policy of private sector-led growth is constrained by the absence of an indigenous business class and the weak capacities of organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, the Sierra Leone Indigenous Business Association (SLIBA) and other apex organizations. Business skills and capacities have to be built. In addition, public-private partnerships (including the outsourcing of certain aspects of the implementation of the PRSP both at central and district levels) need to be forged and the regulatory environment to ensure SME development improved.

2. THE STRATEGY TO ADDRESS THE CHALLENGES

2.1 The Need for a Comprehensive Capacity Building Programme

The programme is designed as a comprehensive framework in order to address the following issues:
· Implementing the PRSP will require enhanced capacities in government institutions, district-level structures, civil society, private sector and the poor - capacity building should therefore be based on a holistic approach.
· The country is emerging from decades of conflict and mass displacement - there is severe erosion of human and social capital and acute lack of capacity which requires a comprehensive approach.
· Past donor and government efforts have often been piece-meal, sector-based, ad hoc and mostly supply-driven. Even more importantly, efforts tended to focus more on skills acquisition and were mostly short-term in nature. Longer-term capacity building efforts must address the issue of institutional incentives that shape the utilization and retention of capacities created, which is vital for sustainability. The summary of capacity building efforts underway found in Appendix IV buttresses this fact and also indicates the imbalance across sectors and institutions.
· The comprehensive reform agenda underway in the country requires a comprehensive approach to capacity building: GOSL with the support of its partners is engaged in a far-reaching and comprehensive economic, social, political and governance reform agenda. Key elements of this new architecture include the Poverty Reduction Strategy, Decentralization, Justice and Security sector reform, Public Service Reform, as well as a spate of new legislation and instruments for improved management of the economy (Budgeting and Accountability Act, National Public Procurement Authority, National Commission on Privatization, the MTEF, etc). These policy instruments will play a determinant role in the success of the PRSP, and provide a good basis for identifying the most critical sets of capacities to spearhead the transformation process. At the same time, they also underscore the need for a comprehensive approach to capacity building.

The programme builds upon sector capacity building initiatives (e.g. the Justice Sector Development Programme) and takes account of ongoing work to revitalize the public service. It in particular draws upon the government’s capacity building policy which is the establishment of a “Senior Executive Service” (SES), the outcomes of the ongoing functional reviews and other activities supported by GRS/DFID and other processes. The programme also factors the departure of UNAMSIL. The programme integrates other capacity building efforts underway or planned.

As capacity building needs are vast priorities of the capacity building programme are guided by the PRSP activity matrix, which is closely aligned with the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF).

2.2 Guiding Principles

The Capacity Building Programme is guided by the following principles:
· Foster national ownership and be demand-driven rather than supply-led;
· Enhancement of management cadres as change leaders in the civil service;
· Comprehensive - integrate needs across sectors and stakeholder groups;
· Address capacity development at the individual, institutional and societal levels - as well as organizational processes that make for effective institutions;
· Focus on “quick-win” options while paying attention to longer-term needs;
· Pay attention to sustainability - an enabling institutional environment to ensure the effective use and retention of capacities created or in place; and
· Address “software” and not “hardware” capacity needs - i.e. the proposal will focus on training and human resources needs, better tools and work methods and institutional development.

2.3 Goal and Objectives

The goal of the capacity building programme is to ensure that the outcomes, impacts and goals of the PRSP are fully met, and to strengthen synergies. The main objectives of the programme are:
I. Facilitate timely and full implementation of PRSP;
II. Ensure coherent support to capacity building efforts by government and its partners; and
III. Strengthen national ownership and sustainability of capacity enhancement in the public sector.

The end result is to have:
v Targets of PRSP met in a timely manner;
v Better skilled and oriented cadres and individuals;
v Enhancement of management cadres as change leaders in the civil service;
v Enhanced capacities for resource planning, absorption and utilization; and
v Responsive and effective institutions - a public service that is effective and efficient for longer-term sustainability and national ownership through a comprehensive public service reform.

2.4 Strategic Thrust and Basic Premise

The basic premise of the Capacity Building programme is that flexible and speedy implementation of activities under the PRSP is critical to ensure that targets are met in a timely manner, but this has to be done within a public service that is effective and efficient for longer-term sustainability and national ownership. The strategy is therefore centred upon the following elements:
v Enhancing the human resource capacities of MDAs to facilitate speedy implementation of the PRSP. This will be done through a variety of means to fill critical gaps in the short-term and will entail more effective utilization of existing staff, provision of short-term national and international expertise, expediting recruitments to critical posts and other measures;
v Upgrading in the short-term of the skills of staff to perform existing functions better and/or assume new higher functions through short-term training (both in country and outside), exposure visits and study tours. A particular focus for such activities are middle level cadres responsible for delivery and output;
v Providing longer-term training to strengthen the expertise base of MDAS to perform critical functions;
v Improving the institutional environment such that a leaner and more performance oriented civil service is in place to promote and facilitate the mission of government in the provision of core public goods and service delivery; and
v Training that targets civil society and the private sector and removing barriers to development of these two stakeholder groups.

2.5 Programme Components

To address the capacity challenges presented in section II, and in line with the objectives and strategy outlined above, the programme will intervene in four key areas, namely:
· Strengthen the institutional framework for coordination, monitoring and resource mobilization;
· Strengthen capacities and competencies of key MDAs in policy development, service delivery and support to decentralization;
· Support improvement of the institutional environment through comprehensive public service reform to ensure capacity retention and sustainability; and
· Enhance capacities of civil society organizations and private sector to play a more effective role in PRSP implementation.

The Table 1 below highlights the key outputs for each of the four programme components. A broad implementation timeframe is presented in Annex 1. Project matrices for the four components of the capacity building programme are presented in Annexes 2-5.

Capacity building is a long-term process requiring long-term commitments and efforts. The initial timeframe for the capacity building programme is two years (2006-2007) in line with the adjusted PRSP timetable. It is recognized that the programme will be a rolling one in keeping with the PRSP and MTEF.

Table 1: Capacity Building Programme Components and Intended Outputs

Programme Component Intended Outputs
1. Strengthening Institutional Framework for Coordination, Monitoring and Resource Mobilization 1. Effective coordination mechanisms in place at national and district levels2. Key lessons on PRSP implementation documented and disseminated3. Baseline established and quality poverty monitoring reports produced to ensure timely monitoring and assessment of impacts4. Improved priority setting, resource mobilization and allocation, including better resource planning and utilization in MDAs
2. Enhancing capacities for Policy development, support to service delivery and Decentralization 1. MDAs have adequate and better skilled cadres and their outreach capacities strengthened2. Key MDAs have improved ability to support decentralization3. Capacities and competencies in policy development, strategic planning and development management in MDAS strengthened, especially for key MDAs4. In-country capacity to provide training in policy, planning and development management and other areas strengthened
3. Improving Institutional Environment, Capacity Retention and Sustainability 1. Comprehensive public service reform completed under Government leadership, and PIUs integrated into the civil service2. Leadership and management capacities developed in the civil service to spearhead institutional transformation3. Improved Human Resources Management in the Civil Service4. A Government ICT policy developed and improved ICT infrastructure and information technology skills in MDAs
4. Strengthening Civil Society and Private Sector 1. Strengthened Civil Society coordination and consultation mechanisms in place2. Capacities of Community based organizations, including women’s networks strengthened 3. Capacity built for policy research, analysis and development in civil society 4. An improved regulatory framework to promote SME development and enhanced public-private partnerships to support PRSP implementation

3. MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS

3.1 Implementation Arrangements

Funding Arrangements: In view of the urgency to address capacity needs for the PRSP, a “Basket” Fund would be put in place to facilitate rapid mobilization of resources needed in the short-term. The Basket Funding is aimed at supporting the overarching goals, outcomes and other potential areas of support and will be managed by UNDP. Development Partners will therefore enter into separate cost sharing arrangements with UNDP that will each provide further details on administration of financing, depositing and disbursement of funds, financial accountability, and other matters. The Ministry of Presidential and Public Affairs/Office of the President (MPPA/OP) as executing agency will be informed of all of these separate arrangements. The instrument (MOU) relating to the basket fund are found in Appendix I.

A Programme/Basket Steering Committee, drawn from government, development partners will provide overall leadership and strategic guidance to the Basket Programme as well as to allow for better coordination among all the actors contributing to the capacity building programme, in particular Government and Development Partners. The Steering Committee will consist of the following members: three selected Development Partners; two representative(s) from the Government; one representative from civil society; the PMU, which will also act as the Secretariat to the Steering Committee. Director of DACO may attend ex officio at any meeting. The co-chairs may decide to invite any other parties, in addition to the normal members, if need arises. See TOR in Appendix II for further details.

The Ministry of Presidential and Public Affairs/Office of the President (MPPA/OP) will have overall responsibility for executing the programme. Locating management of the programme in MPPA/OP will ensure that capacity building goes hand-in-hand with the larger public service reform process. MPPA/OP will therefore be appropriately strengthened to fulfil this role - see Programme Management Unit below.

A Programme Management Unit will be created in MPPA/OP (see TOR in Appendix III). It will be staffed by a programme coordinator, a senior Capacity Development Advisor , programme officers and financial and support staff (TORs in Appendix V). Its functions include setting up joint financing procedure and managing UNDP-donor agreements, substantive support to the capacity building programme management, coordination and oversight of basket sub-programmes, and financial management and audit.

Implementing Partners

Each of the MDAs concerned (Implementing Partners) would be responsible for managing the detailed planning of training and capacity building activities. Based on the approved work plans, the Implementing Partners are responsible for preparing Terms of Reference for programme activities and specifications for equipment, mobilising and managing inputs, implementing activities and producing outputs.

The Implementing Partners prepare periodic and annual work plans for review, consolidation and approval by the steering committee. They also prepare periodic annual progress reports as an integral part of the reporting requirements. The Implementing Partners participate in the review, monitoring, evaluation, audit and coordination of programme activities. They are responsible for implementing, in a timely and effective manner, the decisions taken by as well as the recommendations made by such events.

Management of Training Activities

As the programme foresees significant training activities, a training sub-committee will be set up. This will be superseded, on approval of the draft training policy, by the training coordination mechanisms proposed therein. Key partners such as EU, WB and DFID who are providing training, as well as the ACBF project will be co-opted into the training sub-committee. A priority task of the sub-committee would be to carry out a comprehensive inventory of all donor and government-sponsored training activities and resources committed in order to integrate them into the capacity building programme “Basket Fund”, in line with the MoU (Appendix I).

Each MDA and concerned implementing partners shall prepare an annual training plan for approval by the sub-committee. The latter shall also vet candidates for training to ensure transparency.

To be effective the training received would be considered when promoting staff. Consideration should be given to “bonding” of staff who benefit from training for periods of one year or more. This will avoid a “revolving door” situation wherein newly trained staff quickly leave at much cost to public resources. The sub-committee should make proposals on how such a policy will be implemented, in consultation with the ESO.

Implementation of Civil Society Capacity Building Activities

Capacity building activities for civil society organizations shall be implemented by MODEP through its NGO unit which will be appropriately strengthened. This component will be closely coordinated with ENCISS.

Management of the grant funds targeting women and women organization shall be outsourced to an NGO based on competitive bidding.

3.2 Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting

The programme is subject to review every calendar year on request of the government and partners. Towards the end of the programme, a terminal review will be held. The programme may be subject to an in-depth, external evaluation to assess its overall performance, the outputs/outcomes produced against its initial targets, the impact it has brought about or would likely bring about, its relevance to the national context and management efficiency. A mid-term evaluation will be undertaken to ensure that such lessons and recommendations are incorporated in the work plans of the programme during the rest of its life. The timing and necessity of this evaluation will be decided based on mutual agreement between Government and partners.

4. Indicative Budget

The estimated cost of the programme is $ 20 million over two years - see Table below.

Table 2: Indicative Programme Budget

Programme Components Budget (2006-2007)($)
1. Strengthening Institutional Framework for Coordination, Monitoring and Resource Mobilization 3,764,500
2. Enhancing capacities for Policy development, support to service delivery and Decentralization 13,610,000
5. Improving Institutional Environment, Capacity Retention and Sustainability 1,116,000
5. Strengthening Civil Society and Private Sector 6,608,000
5. Programme Management Costs (766,000)
Sub-Total 18,490,500
6. Admin Costs (3%) 554,700
7. Contingencies (5%) 924,500
TOTAL 19,969,200

The indicative budget does not include cost of elements of some of the components of the programme, and these are marked “PM” in the detailed project matrices. With respect to component one, funds already committed by UNDP, EU and DFID, as well as GOSL will cover a substantial part of the budgeted figure for that component. Similarly, with respect to component three dealing with the institutional environment some of the key activities benefit from ongoing support. The budgetary support for an improved incentive package in the civil service could not be determined at this stage.

Programme Component Intended Outcomes 2006 2007
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
1. Strengthening Institutional Framework for coordination, Monitoring and Resource Mobilization 1. Effective coordination mechanisms in place at national and district levels
2. Key lessons on PRSP implementation documented and disseminated
3. Quality poverty monitoring reports produced to ensure timely monitoring and assessment of impacts
4. Improved priority setting, resource mobilization and allocation, including better resource planning and utilization in MDAs
2. Enhancing capacities for Policy development, support to service delivery and Decentralization 1. MDAs have adequate better skilled cadres and their outreach capacities strengthed
2. Key MDAs have improved ability to support decentralization
3. A strategy for strengthening policy and planning units in various MDAS, developed and improved skills in policy analysis, strategic planning in key MDAs
4. In-country capacity to provide training in policy, planning and development management strengthened
3. Improving Institutional environment, capacity retention and sustainability 1. Comprehensive public service reform completed under Government leadership, and PIUs integrated into civil service
2. Leadership capacities developed in the civil service to spearhead institutional transformation
3. Improved Human Resources Management
4. A government ICT policy developed and improved ICT infrastructure and information technology skills in key MDAs
4. Strengthening civil society and private sector 1. Strengthened civil society coordination and consultation mechanisms in place
2. Capacities of Community based organizations, including women’s network strengthened
3. Capacity built for policy research, analysis and development in civil society
4. Improved regulatory environment to promote SME development and public-private partnerships in place to support PRSP implementation
Programme Management Unit

Intended Outputs1. Effective coordination mechanisms in place at national and district levels2. Key lessons on PRSP implementation documented and disseminated3. Quality poverty monitoring reports produced to ensure timely monitoring and assessment of impacts4. Improved priority setting, resource mobilization and allocation, including better resource planning and utilization in MDAs
Indicative Activities Inputs Budget(2006-2007)
1.1 Strengthen DACO to undertake its expanded coordination functions - recruit technical and support staff · Personnel - Director, Development Aid Coordinator, Programme Officers and Development Communication Officer $391,000
1.2 Provide training (short-term) and organize exposure visits/study tours for DACO staff within the region and elsewhere · Fees and Travel $500,000
1.3 Provide support for DACO Coordination Activities - servicing DEPAC, IMC and NTC, and liaison with MDAs, Donors and other stakeholders - $150,000
1.4 Strengthen technical capacities of DACO through a pool of expertise (international and national) to provide advisory services on demand, including assisting DACO review and document key lessons learnt from implementation · International expertise· National expertise $400,000$160,000
1.5 Arrange exposure visits for IMC and NTC members to countries implementing PRSP and support their participation in relevant poverty conferences, workshops and related fora · Travel and study tours $100,000
1.6 Strengthen district coordination mechanisms - provide support to establish them and conduct training on their roles: design training, deliver training and monitor impact by follow up · National expertise plus 4 facilitators (24 months)· 4 regional workshops/year· Travel $36,000$60,000$50,000
2.1 Organize regular fora (e.g. workshops) for stakeholders to share experiences at national and regional levels - on an annual basis organize one national workshop and 4 regional ones (East, West, North and South) · National expertise and 4 facilitators· 4 regional workshops each targeting 100 participants· 1 national workshop/year· Report production and other costs $36,000$64,000$16,000$50,000
2.2 Publish on a quarterly basis a PRSP bulletin and other products (e.g. policy briefs) to encourage sharing of experiences, disseminate timely information on the PRSP to the public and policy makers, respectively · National expertise (12 months)· Printing and distribution $ 18,000$50,000
3.1 Strengthen staff capacities to coordinate M&E activities and provide guidance to other entities involved in M&E - recruit M&E expert · Staff position $73,000
3.2 Strengthen staff capacity of DACO for poverty analysis - recruit a poverty data analyst (to be located within SSL in order to strengthen institutional linkages) · Staff position $61,500
3.3 Provide technical assistance to design and put in place a poverty monitoring framework to adequately track poverty outcomes, impacts and goals at both macro-level and at the grassroots · International expertise (6 months)· Travel $60,000$6,000
3.4 Provide technical support to design and set up a poverty monitoring data base at DACO, assess needs to strengthen management information systems of key MDAS and establish data bases as needed · International expertise (9 months)· Travel· Equipment for data base· National expertise (12 months) $90,000$6,000$100,000$18,000
3.5 Provide external training (within region) to SSL staff to improve M&E capacities · Training within region of 12 staff $120,000
3.6 Design and conduct or outsource training on data collection and analysis for relevant staff in key MDAs (agriculture, education and health) · International expertise (3 months)· Travel· 2 training workshops - participants, venue, etc· Local facilitators/trainers (6m) $30,000$6,000$20,000$9,000
3.7 Design courses and conduct training for local council line ministry staff involved in data collection and analysis · National expertise (6 months)· 4 regional w/shops· Follow up and assessment of training impact $9,000$28,000$25,000
3.8 Conduct a poverty and social impact assessment and baseline survey and produce report · International and national expertise (design assessment, train and supervise staff, analyze and write report)· Data collectors/facilitators· Travel· Report production costs $400,000
3.9 Collate data and produce PRSP monitoring reports twice yearly - expertise, training of DACO staff, production costs) · Report production costs $10,000
3.10 Strengthen M&E supervisory capacity of NTC sector working groups (Macroeconomic, Social, Private Sector Development, Governance & Security and Agriculture & Food Security) · Study tour/Travel $100,000
3.11 Design and conduct training on poverty social impact assessments and budget analysis and public expenditure management for civil society organizations · National expertise (6 months)· 1 national workshop/year targeting 100-200 participants· Follow up and assessment $9,000$20,000
3.12 Strengthen the role of Parliament in M&E activities through networking and exposure visits · International Travel $50,000
4.1 Expertise to help develop an Aid policy for Sierra Leone that will guide resource mobilization priorities; and hold national consultations on draft policy · International expertise (3 months)· Travel· National workshop $30,000$6,000$12,000
4.2 Provide support for training of NRA staff to enhance resource mobilization capacities · Fees and travel $100,000
4.3 Design and conduct training for Local Councils on resource mobilization and help them draw up appropriate strategies · International expertise (6m)· Travel · National expertise (12 months)· 4 Training workshops· Follow up support $60,000$6,000$18,000$28,000$50,000
4.4 Design courses and conduct training for MDA staff on project planning, implementation and monitoring and reporting to enhance resource planning and utilization · National expertise (6 months)· 4 local facilitators· 2 national workshops/year· Follow up assessment of training impact $9,000$24,000$40,000$50,000
TOTAL BUDGET FOR COMPONENT $3,764,500

Intended Outputs1. MDAs have adequate and better skilled cadres (to support service delivery) and their outreach capacities strengthened 2. Key MDAs have improved ability to support decentralization3. Capacities and competencies in policy development, strategic planning and development management in MDAS strengthened, especially for key MDAs4. In-country capacity to provide training in policy, planning and development management strengthened, and strategy to strengthen middle level training institutions developed
Indicative Activities Inputs Budget (2006-2007)
1.1. Undertake assessment of key vacancies in MDAs and work with Establishment secretary’s Office to fill the vacancies, taking into account recommendations of the functional reviews and decentralization - expertise to conduct staff vacancy assessment · National expertise (6 months) $9,000
1.2 Conduct short-term refresher or skills upgrading courses (in-country) targeted at middle level staff in key MDAs (MAFFS, MEST, MOHS, MFMR) - assessment of training needs, design of training courses and conduct of training activities. Activities for distance learning for unqualified teachers include · Reproduction of distance learning packages· Facilitators· Support for traineesFollow up and monitoring · National expertise (36 months)· Conduct of training sessions for various MDAs (36 per year - five sets of training sessions per MDA/year)· Distance learning package for unqualified teachers - 3000· Evaluation and follow up of training activities $54,000$750,000$600,000$50,000
1.3 Provide longer-term training (in-country and outside) to upgrade technical skills - post-graduate level training in key MDAs · Scholarship pool of 5 per year per MDA (60 graduate and post graduate scholarships $1,200,000
1.4 Develop and implement a programme to deploy 10 UNVs (TOKTEN) to fill immediate short-term needs and gaps in the middle-level cadre in agriculture, education and health · 10 UNV (TOKTEN) staff and other costs $1.03 million
1.5 Develop and implement, in collaboration with UNDP and IOM, a MIDA programme to bring in 25 highly skilled Sierra Leone nationals in the Diaspora - the skills required and host MDAs to be specified during design of programme · International expertise (3 m)· Travel· 25 experts from Diaspora· Other - SL missions abroad $30,000$6,000$2,4 million$100,000
1.6 Negotiate and deploy 25 professionals through other south-south exchanges PM
2.1 Provide staff to strengthen the capacities of key ministries to support the decentralization process - health, education and agriculture, including setting up and/or strengthening decentralization M&E capacity within key MDAs · 6 national experts (MAFFS, MEST, MOHS) for 12 months· Study tours for staff in decentralization units $216,000$50,000
2.2 Design and conduct Training of Trainers for key ministries and expand training of youth and women involved in productive activities (e.g. farming and fisheries):· Training of Trainers (MAFFS) - 1,500 trainers and 1,400 farmer facilitators· Training to establish 100,000 Farmer Field schools· Training of 150 communities on inland fisheries technologies (MFMR) · Expertise (national and international) to design courses· Cost of training of trainers· Cost of training activities· Follow up of training activities $2,500,000
2.3 Design and conduct or outsource training for district technical staff on the decentralization process and their roles and responsibilities in improved service delivery · National expertise for 6 months (30 months)· 1 training w/shop/year for each of the four regions)· Local travel and other costs to assess impact of training activities $45,000$80,000$50,000
2.4 Strengthen capacity of MODEP to support district-based planning - staff, expertise to design and conduct training sessions on district-based planning · Put in place a decentralized development planning system· Prepare national development planning guidelines for district planning to ensure consistency with PRSP· Provide support in the preparation of LC plans· Assist in setting up participatory monitoring of district plans · MODEP staff position· International expertise (6 months)· Travel· 4 facilitators· 4 regional training courses per year· Production of training materials· Local travel and other costs to assess impact $24,000$60,000$6,000$36,000$80,000$50,000$100,000
3.1 Provide technical support to review the existing policy planning units, make recommendations on their re-structuring and develop a strategy on strengthening policy development and strategic planning capacities across key MDAs (MAFFS, MEST, MODEP, MOHS) - expertise, etc · International expertise (6m)· Travel· National expertise (12 months) $60,000$6,000$18,000
3.2 Design and conduct or outsource short-term training on policy development, strategic planning and management giving priority to MEST, MAFFS, MODEP, MTI - within region (e.g. GIMPA) · Short-term training of 60 staff for MDAs (MAFFS, MOHS, MEST, MODEP, MFMR, MTI)· Post graduate training of 20 staff $300,000$400,000
3.3 Provide technical assistance to strengthen planning and policy divisions in key MDAs giving priority to agriculture, education, health, development and trade · TA in Policy planning Units of MAFFS, MEST, MOHS, MTI, MODEP) - 24 months $1,200,000
4.1 Strengthen the capacity of IPAM to provide training on policy formulation and strategic planning to meet the continuing need for the upgrading of skills for a variety of state and non-state actors · Staff development· Facilities· Training costs $2,000,000
4.2 Assessment of training resources (facilities, staffing, etc) of the main training institutes for middle level technical staff for agriculture, health and education and developing a strategy to strengthen them · Expertise (national and International) to conduct assessments and develop strategy $100,000
TOTAL BUDGET FOR COMPONENT $13,610,000

Intended Outputs1. Comprehensive Public Service Reform completed under Government leadership and PIUs integrated into civil service2. Leadership and management capacities developed in the civil service to spearhead institutional transformation3. Improved Human Resources Management and Records Management4. A government ICT policy developed and improved ICT infrastructure and information technology skills in key MDAs
Indicative Activities Inputs Budget (2006-2007)
1.1 Strengthen the MPPA/OP through creation of a Prgramme Management Unit (PMU) to implement capacity building programme and coordinate public service reform process - expertise, staffing and operational costs. Key activities include: finalization of a comprehensive public Service Reform strategy building upon various initiatives; conduct workshop to select design options and develop implementation plan · Staff (Programme coordinator, capacity dev. Advisor, admin/finance, programme staff), · Expertise (International and national), · study tour travels, workshop· Operational costs· other costs (equipment, vehicle) $316,000$100,000$100,000$150,000$100,000
1.2 Support (through outsourcing) the process of re-profiling, development of key competencies and selection of new management cadre and change leaders, including integration of relevant staff in PIUs $100,000
1.3 Finalize a comprehensive pay and grading system for “non SES staff” of civil service PM
1.4 Provision of budgetary support for an improved incentive package in the upper levels of the Civil Service
1.4 Undertake comprehensive organizational reviews and restructure key MDAs - expertise, retreats to agree restructuring options and develop implementation plans and approval by Cabinet PM
2.1 Design and conduct or outsource training for management cadres to act as change agents in the context of revitalizing the public service - leadership training and team building to infuse a new ethos PM
3.1 Establish a Human Resources Management Office - expertise, conduct training and provide supporting equipment PM
3.2 Strengthen HRM units in key MDAs - provide expertise to strengthen HRM units PM
3.3 Revitalize the civil service training college and provide capacity for training middle level civil servants PM
3.4 Review and adopt draft Training Policy PM
4.1 Provide technical assistance to help develop a government ICT policy - expertise to design policy, validate and seek Cabinet approval · Int. expertise (6 m)· Travel· Workshop on draft policy $60,000$6,000$15,000
4.2 Undertake a feasibility study on upgrading the ICT base of key MDAs and · International expertise (6m)· National expertise (6m) $60,000$9,000
4.3 Establish a Wide Area Network (WAN) to link key MDAS and to upgrade ICT infrastructure in key MDAs - set up VSAT equipment, etc · ICT equipment· VSAT· Installation and other costs PM$100,000PM
TOTAL BUDGET FOR COMPONENT $1,116,000

Intended Outputs1. Strengthened civil society coordination and consultation mechanisms in place2. Capacities of Community based organizations, including women’s network strengthened 3. Capacity built for policy research, analysis and development in civil society 4. An improved regulatory framework to promote SME development and enhanced public-private partnerships to support PRSP implementation
Indicative Activities Inputs Budget
1.1 Provide support to Civil Society Movement (CSM/SL) to develop and validate a strategy for civil society involvement in PRSP implementation - expertise and workshops · National expertise (6m)· Workshop participation· Report production and dissemination $18,000$10,000$10,000
1.2 Provide institutional support to strengthen institutional capacities for coordination and consultation by CSM/SL - staff, coordination and operating costs (24m) · Staff· Coordination costs· Other $100,000
1.3 Provide staff to strengthen capacity of MODEP to act as clearing house of NGOs and support streamlining of activities · Maintain data base of NGOs in country and sectors of intervention and geographic focus· Guide operations and facilitate more balanced distribution of NGO activities in country· Provide relevant information on NGO activities · National staff (24 months)· Data base and other costs· Operating costs $36,000$50,000$100,000
2.1 Provide training and capacity building to community based organizations (target 4,000 individuals) to strengthen planning, project implementation and resource mobilization capacities - consultants to design courses, conduct training one for each of the four regions · National expertise (48 months)· Training workshops - 40· Training Facilitators - 10· Follow up activities $72,000$400,000$180,000$50,000
2.2 Establish a small grants programme to support activities of rural and urban women organizations - prepare guidelines, provide information and training, set up grant approval mechanism, set up follow up and evaluation mechanisms in collaboration with LCs and NGOs · Programme coordinator· Grant· M&E $48,000$5,000,000$50,000
2.3 Provide financial support and technical assistance to the Women’s Forum and network - institutional support to facilitate participation in policy dialogues, various implementation mechanisms and to take part in M&E exercises, aimed specifically to ensuring the integration of gender concerns in PRSP implementation · Expertise for strategy development· Validation workshop· Coordination activities - travel and other costs $9,000$10,000$100,000
2.4 Provide training support to women members of WARD committees to strengthen their participation in monitoring and reporting activities · National expertise (12m)· 4 regional workshops/year· Follow up to assess impact and provide further coaching and mentoring (Travel) $18,000$56,000$50,000
3.1 Provide training to strengthen policy research, analysis and development skills in civil society - expertise for development of training materials and conduct of workshops PM
3.2 Provide small grants to NGOs and other civil society organizations to undertake policy research PM
4.1 Strengthen MTI to develop improved regulatory framework for SME development · International expertise (6m)· Travel· Other costs $60,000$6,000$100,000
4.2 Support re-structuring of SLEDIC - a detailed needs assessment conducted. · Staff· Training · other PM
4.3 Improve performance of Standards Bureau · Staff - assessors· Attachments and study tours PM$ 75,000
4.4 Developing public-private partnerships in energy, agriculture and infrastructure PM
TOTAL BUDGET FOR COMPONENT $6,608,000

Ministry, Department and Agency Training Needs Manpower/Staffing Technical Assistance Other Support
Ministry of Agriculture Forestry and Food Security - MAFFS · Training of 1,500 trainers and 1,400 Farmer Facilitators in order to establish an additional 100,000 Farmer Field Schools· Middle-level cadres: Forestry (20), Livestock (livestock Assistants - 50, livestock inspectors -50), Crops (100), M&E (20), Research (40), Land and Water (10)· Management training for cadres at District Director Level and above (50)· Higher level training: Livestock (15), Research (69), M&E (22), Crops (50) Land and water (10), Forestry (30)· PEMSD: Planning - short-term courses (8), post graduate level (6), Seminars and other short-term courses; M&E - Short-term training for M&E (8), post graduate training M&E (6), train 12 junior, 48 middle-level; Statistics - 6 senior level and 12 other levels. · Senior Policy Advisors and Planners· M&E Experts · Rehabilitate/revitalize MAFFS training centers at Ogoo Farm, Makali, Musaia, Teko, Kenema, Batkanu, Pendembu, Kpuwabu, Woama, Gberia
Ministry of Education, Science & Technology - MEST · Distance learning - develop distance learning packages to target 3,000 unqualified teachers over three years· Training in educational planning and statistics · 15 Officers in Planning Directorate and 6 junior staff· Strengthening the decentralization unit - · Technical Assistance to review Education sector policy· Technical assistance to strengthen educational planning activities· Technical Assistance to strengthen budgeting capacities· Technical assistance to establish a GIS-based schools facilities mapping · Consultancy and Technical support to design and establish a Payroll Unit at MEST HQ;· Support to Establish Teaching Service Commission;· Support to align Education Act with Local Government Act;· Public information and awareness through establishment of Mobile Units· Develop a BSc in Science degree at Milton Maggai College
Ministry of Health and Sanitation - MOHS · Primary Health Care (PHC): 75 Community Health Officers; 1000 MCH Aides to acquire life saving skills and increase intake of MCH Aides to 1500· Local training/In-service: 4 Midwifery trainers; 600 State enrolled Community Health Nurses; 200 Medical Officers; 300 SRN; 20 Nurse Anaesthetists; training in data analysis (various packages); training on management of severe malnutrition· External training: 8 DMOs; 8 Programme coordinators; 4 Midwifery Trainers; 13 Public Health sisters; 4 O & G; 3 VVF surgeons; 1 Researcher and 2 Assistants.· Malaria Control Programme: currently receiving support from Global Fund, WB UNICEF and WHO. Gap includes training of staff in M&E, Research methods, Advocacy and partnership building. · 234 Medical Officers· 25 Obstetrician - gynaecologists· Hospital Managers· 11 PH specialists· 488 SRN· 368 CHO· 103 State Certified Midwives· 847 State Enrolled Community Health Nurses· 115 Environmental Health Officers and Superintendents;· 3 Sanitary Engineers· 13 Nutritionists· Health statisticians · Technical assistance in food fortification - 6-12 months · Conducting sensitization for national micronutrient days
Ministry of Trade and Industry - MTI · On-the-job training; in-service training for SLEDIC staff; SLEDIC school providing training for business community· Attachment programmes for Assessors in SLSB to older standards institutions abroad · Enhancing competition and export - restructuring of SLEDIC & regulatory environment for SMEs- 1 Director, 1 Deputy Director, 2 Senior economists, 2 Economists, staff for proposed Investment & Export Agencies)· Business environment supportive of SME development - 1 senior Industrial Officer, I Engineer, 1 Economist· Standards Bureau - 5 Lead assessors, 12 Assessors· SLEDIC “One Stop Shop” - 4 Project officers and 3 Field officers· Cooperatives - 6 senior cooperative officers · 2 International Consultants - SLEDIC· I international consultant - SLEDIC· 1 international consultant for SLSB· MTI - consultancies for legal reforms · Product development workshops;· Micro-credit workshops· Website/Web Portal· Access to information - internet facilities, journals and enhancement of WTO Reference centre
Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources - MFMR · Capacity to train 400 persons in aquaculture - 5 Resource Persons.· Capacity to Train 150 people in Fish Pond Development - 5 Resource Persons.· Training of 60 extension workers to man 6 fisheries outstations (Training in Fisheries Management, Boat Building, Marine Engineering, Fishing Technology, Fish Processing and Handling, Logistics, Fisheries Policy and Legislation). · Promotion of inland fisheries: 30 field staff, 5 supervisors and 2 coordinators.· Four Management Staff and 3 Technicians. · 1 Freshwater Biologist and 1 Fishing Gear Technologist.· Aquaculture Planner and Fish Feed Technologist· Socio-Economist (Extension Techniques), Processing and Packaging Experts, Shrimp Culture Experts, Marketing Expert and Shrimp Hatchery Manager · Logistics support
Ministry of Development and Economic Planning - MODEP · Training on strategic planning, programme/project development and M&E· Training on district-based planning for LCs · Director strategic planning & deputy· Director M&E· Coordinator NGO activities· Others · 3 International experts (district-based planning, M&E and MIS) · Upgrading MODEP documentation centre
Ministry of Energy & Power - Water and Sanitation Division · Organization of 5-day training workshop on field data collection for enumerators· Organization of 5-day training workshop on water quality surveillance and monitoring for field monitors · Field enumerators (12 months) to carry out nationwide inventory of WATSAN facilities to determine coverage· Trained water analyst (12 months)· Water quality surveillance and monitoring expert (6 months)· Expert trainer - 18 months· IT specialist - 6 months· Hydrologist - 36 months· · Technical assistance for 4 months to develop Integrated National Water Supply and Sanitation Sector Policy· Consulting firm to undertake environmental impact assessment studies of project areas · Organization of 2 consultative workshops for development of a national water sector policy
Statistic Sierra Leone - SL · National Accounts and Statistics: training of 30 staff (WAIFEM, IMF and Statics Institute);· External Trade Statistics: training of 24 staff (Development Training International, Foundation for International Development, Statistical Institute, WAIFEM, AFRISTAT, Statistics Britain)· Price and Labour Statistics: training 10 staff (WAIFEM, ECOWAS Community Computer Centre);· Business and Industry Statistics: training 2 staff (overseas).

Appendix I: Draft MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

AMONG A GROUP OF DEVELOPMENT PARTNERS
ON
COOPERATION FOR SUPPORT TO
CAPACITY BUILDING FOR THE SIERRA LEONE POVERT REDUCTION STRATEGY PAPER 2005-2007

The Participants to this Memorandum of Understanding (hereinafter “MOU”) are the governments of [insert names of Governments] as represented by their official representatives in Freetown (hereinafter referred to as the “Partner Governments”), and the multilateral agency the United Nations Development Programme (hereinafter the “UNDP”), as represented by its official representative in Freetown. These Partner Governments and UNDP together constitute the “Development Partners” under this MOU. Other partners may join the MOU and become Partner Governments by Addendum to it.

Noting that Sierra Leone has now embarked upon full implementation of the PRSP and has designed a capacity building programme to ensure full implementation

Noting that the Parties to this MOU have decided to extend support to ensure that adequate capacities are in place to ensure that the PRSP is implemented in a timely manner;

Noting further that residual resources from support activities currently being conducted by the Development Partners in the context of support to capacity building activities may be transferred into the 2006 - 2007 capacity building Basket;

Emphasizing that ultimately any support to capacity building must stress Sierra Leonean ownership and leadership;

Emphasizing that the overall quality of past efforts although significant has been ad hoc and largely uncoordinated and that a more coordinated donor support will contribute to overcoming extensive challenges faced by Government and all stakeholders in meeting the PRSP objectives in a timely manner

Have accepted on the following:

Article 1: Targeted Results

1. The three overarching goals and expected outcomes of the Development Partners’ support to the capacity building programme to support implementation of the SL-PRSP:

a. Facilitating timely and full implementation of the PRSP;
b. Ensuring coherent support to capacity building efforts by government and its partners; and
c. Strengthening national ownership and sustainability of capacity enhancement through a comprehensive public service reform.

2. The Development Partners expect that Government, and civil society, together with the Development Partners, will foster a collaborative approach to capacity building for the PRSP. The programme targets a broad range of stakeholders involved with implementing the PRSP - MDAs, civil society, district councils, local communities and the private sector and would benefit under this MOU. Other institutions, organisations and processes may be supported by and through it according to needs that are subsequently identified and accepted by the Development Partners.

3. To enhance work towards the overarching goals and expected outcomes, the Development Partners will promote and participate in general coordination activities and information sharing with partners outside of this group.

4. A programme matrix and budget contained in a UNDP project document, based on a comprehensive needs assessment, analysis, research and extensive consultation has been developed to further articulate and operationalize the Development Partners’ contribution to the strategic results identified above.

Article 2: Financing Arrangements

1. The Partner Governments will enter into joint financing (or, Basket Funding) to support the overarching goals, outcomes and other potential areas of support as stated in Article 1. This joint financing arrangement is referred to hereinafter as “the Capacity Building Basket” or simply “the Basket.”

2. The Basket will be managed by UNDP. The Development Partner will therefore enter into separate cost sharing arrangements with UNDP that will each provide further details on administration of financing, depositing and disbursement of funds, financial accountability, and other matters. The separate cost sharing arrangements will be governed by their own termination and duration clauses. The MOPA will be informed of all of these separate arrangements.

Article 3: Management Arrangements

A Basket Steering Committee (hereinafter ‘The Steering Committee’) will be established and be responsible for overall leadership of the Basket

1. The Steering Committee will provide guidance and strategic direction of the programme of work of the Capacity Building Basket. Membership on the Steering Committee will consist of representatives of Government, civil society, selected Partner Governments, and UNDP. UNDP will act as the Secretariat to the Steering Committee. The Minister for Presidential affairs and the two lead Development Partners will chair the Steering Committee as a triumvirate. Development Partner representatives to the Steering Committee will ensure that perspectives of all the Basket members are taken on board and also they will be obliged to share the outcome of steering committee meetings with other Basket members.

2. The Development Partners agree that a dedicated Programme Management Unit (hereinafter “PMU”) will be established by UNDP/MOPA to manage the Basket on a day-to-day basis. The PMU will be staffed with the appropriate capacity, including financial expertise, to manage the substantive and operational aspects of the Basket and will be supplemented by UNDP’s internal human and material capacity. Detailed Terms of Reference, attached to this MOU, set out parameters of the PMU.

3. The Terms of Reference for the Steering Committee (Appendix III) shall be subject to amendment by addendum to this MOU. The Terms of Reference of the PMU (Appendix II) shall be subject to amendment by decision of the Steering Committee. All Terms of Reference shall be an integral part of this MOU.

4. The work of the Steering Committee will ensure the Government is part of the management of the program, not only in the Government’s membership on the Committee, but also in terms of coordinating the Government’s financial and substantive input to the capacity building programme covered by this MOU.

Article 4: Guiding Principles

1. Activity components under the Basket that are contracted out will be processed through competitive bidding, according to UNDP procurement rules and regulations.

2. Procedures for submission and selection of proposals for any of the technical activities under the Basket will be processed in accordance with procedures to be developed by the PMU and UNDP guidelines.

3. To the extent possible, the PMU will take the cost effectiveness and good track record into consideration when making contracting and programming decisions under this MOU.

Article 5: Consultation and Communication

1. Frequency of Steering Committee meetings are established in their Terms of Reference. The Secretariat to the Steering Committee will take on responsibility for disseminating information on Basket decisions to the Development Partners by circulating the relevant agreed documents. Participants in the meetings will be the members of the Steering Committee and/or their designated representatives.

2. Complementary to their role as co-chairs of the Steering Committee, the lead Development Partners will interface between the Secretariat (UNDP), the Basket donors, and will lead political engagement processes necessary for effective implementation of this MOU on behalf of the Development Partners.

3. The Secretariat shall circulate minutes of the Steering Committee to its members and all Development Partners.

4. All contributors to the Basket, that is all Development Partners, will meet at least once every six months to review programme progress.

5. Additional consultation and communication mechanisms may be developed ad hoc.

Article 6: Administration, Monitoring, Reporting and Audit

1. In the interests of local ownership and national capacity transfer the PMU assist MPA understand the underlying principles of accountability and financial probity being exercised in the management of the Basket.

2. The administrative, monitoring and reporting requirements among the Partner Governments and UNDP will be articulated in the following documents, as appropriate: the respective cost sharing agreements, the various Terms of Reference appended to this MOU specifically those of PMU and the project document.

3. Notwithstanding the above, these functions will include, inter alia, submission of quarterly substantive/technical reports, financial monitoring and reporting; and monitoring and reporting of results, including that signed against outcome indicators as may be articulated in the project document.

4. According to UNDP’s rules and regulations and as articulated in the separate cost sharing arrangements between UNDP and the Partner Governments the Basket will be audited / reviewed at least once during the programme implementation and after its termination. Additional audit(s) shall also be subject to UNDP’s rules and regulations

Article 7: Benchmarking

1. The Development Partners accept to assess the effectiveness of the Basket and development partner support for the capacity building programme by reference to the following key, but non-comprehensive, benchmarks:

a. Institutional Coordination of Implementation: effective coordination mechanisms in place at national and district levels; key lessons on PRSP implementation documented and disseminated; quality poverty monitoring reports produced to ensure timely monitoring and assessment of impacts; improved priority setting and resource allocation for the PRSP, including better resource planning and utilization among MDAs.

b. Capacity development for Policy development, support to Service Delivery and Decentralization: adequate and better skilled cadres; key MDAs have improved ability to support decentralization; a strategy for strengthening policy and planning units in various MDAS, developed; improved skills in policy analysis, strategic planning and development management.

c. Improving Institutional environment, Capacity retention and Sustainability: comprehensive Public sector reform completed under Government leadership; leadership capacities developed in the civil service to spearhead institutional transformation; improved Human Resources Management, Records Management and better skilled middle level civil servants - administrative cadres; Government ICT policy developed and improved ICT infrastructure and information technology skills in key MDAs

d. Strengthening civil society and private sector: strengthened civil society coordination and consultation mechanisms; capacities of Community based organizations, including women’s network strengthened; capacity built for policy research, analysis and development in civil society; regulatory framework to promote SME development in place.

Article 8: Interpretation and Amendment of the MOU

1. Any dispute, controversy or claim arising out of the arrangements described in this MOU or any addendum concluded hereunder will be settled by consultations or negotiations between the Development Partners or in such other manner as the Development Partners may agree.

2. Consultations with a view to amending this MOU may be held at the request of the Development Partners. The proposed amendment will be communicated in writing to the Secretariat to the Steering Committee, which will circulate it to the Development Partners and will convene an ad hoc meeting of the Development Partners to decide on the amendment. The quorum for such an ad hoc meeting is 75 percent of all Development Partners signatory to this MOU and the decisions will be adopted by 75 percent of the present and voting Development Partners. The decision on the amendment will be circulated by the Secretariat to all Development Partners present and voted for signing and upon signing by all of them it will enter into force and will be binding to all Development Partners signatory to this MOU. The amendments will form an integral part of the MOU as addenda to it.

3. The Development Partners agree while interpreting the provisions contained in the following documents, they take precedence over one another in case of conflict in the following order:
-  This MOU
-  The Terms of Reference for the Steering Committee (Appendix III)
-  The Terms of Reference of the PMU (Appendix II)

Article 9: Termination

This MOU expires, after the national elections and not later than 31 December 2007 or when the Development Partners decide that it is no longer needed. It may be terminated sooner by consensus of the Development Partners, and likewise may be extended under the same circumstances. A Development Partner may withdraw unilaterally by the provision of three months’ notice without affecting the validity of the MOU for the remaining Participants.

Article 10: Entry into force

This MOU enters into force upon the signature of all Participants.

Article 11: Addresses

Any written communications between the Development Partners pursuant to this MOU may be sent to the addresses specified below, or to such addresses that the party concerned may specify:

Signed in ______ # of copies in the English language at Freetown, Sierra Leone,

this ____ day of ___________, in the year Two Thousand and Five.

Signature: Signature:
Designation: Designation:
Date: Date:

And Witnessed by

Signature: Signature:
Designation: Designation:
Date: Date:

Appendix II: Terms of Reference for the

Basket Steering Committee

Capacity Building Programme to Implement the Sierra Leone Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper 2006-2007

Background
1. Sierra Leone has embarked upon implementation of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper. This capacity building programme has been developed to address the multifaceted capacity needs to implement the PRSP. It is based on the clear recognition that the poor institutional capacities in the public sector to plan and deliver services coupled with the weaknesses in institutional absorptive capacities if unaddressed will make it difficult to implement the PRSP. The programme builds upon prior and ongoing assistance provided by Government and Sierra Leone’s development partners, and seeks to ensure that the outcomes, impacts and goals of the PRSP are fully met. By offering a framework for capacity building, the programme aims to strengthen synergies and reduce duplication of efforts. Institutional issues that shape the retention of capacities are addressed in order to ensure that capacity building efforts are sustainable and demand-led.
2. Following discussions between the UNDP Country Office and the consortium of donors around a proposal submitted by the former, an agreement has been reached in principle that the UNDP be vested with responsibility for the management of the multi-donor basket. The multi-donor framework (i.e. the basket) has as its overarching goal supporting the comprehensive capacity building framework to ensure that the targets of PRSP met in a timely manner, the key ministries, departments and agencies have better skilled and oriented cadres; there are improved capacities to plan, absorb and utilize resources; and responsive and effective public institutions. The main outputs of the multi-donor programme are contained in the parent MOU document, and to be agreed to though a UNDP Project Document thereby bringing in Government and Development Partners into a common framework.
3. UNDP proposes to establish a dedicated Programme Management Unit (PMU) at the Ministry of Presidential Affairs to manage the programme. The strategy to establish a dedicated Unit is informed by the recognition that as Sierra Leone moves to a more long-term development process, government capacity to execute programmes must be reinforced through establishment of a NEX modality.

Overarching Responsibility of the Steering Committee
4. As outlined in the Development Partner’s MOU, a high-level Basket Steering Committee (hereinafter ‘The Steering Committee’) will be constituted to provide overall leadership and strategic guidance to the Basket Programme as well as to allow for better coordination among all the actors contributing to the capacity building programme, in particular Government and Development Partners.

Specific Responsibilities
5. The Steering Committee will perform the following:

a. Make decisions by consensus on any issues that would facilitate the effective management and functioning of the PMU in line with the provisions of the MOU, the 2006-2007 UNDP project document, and the TORs for the PMU.
b. Review and provide guidance on matters relating to substantive support to the capacity building programme, (financing procedure; coordination and oversight of basket sub-programmes).
c. Provide guidance to the PMU on implementation of specific matters decided upon during the Steering Committee meetings.
d. Donor representatives to the Steering Committee will ensure that perspectives of all the Basket members are taken on board, and also they will be obliged to share the outcome of Steering Committee meetings with other Basket members at the regular Basket meetings.

Constitution of the Steering Committee
6. The Steering Committee will consist of the following [nine] members:

a. Three selected Development Partners; and
b. Two representative(s) from the Government;
c. One representative from civil society;
d. The PMU, which will also act as the Secretariat to the Steering Committee.

7. Director of DACO may attend ex officio at any meeting. The co-chairs may decide to invite any other parties, in addition to the normal members, if need arises.

Quorum
8. Quorum will be five of the [nine] members of the steering committee

Chairs and meetings:
9. The Minister of Presidential Affairs and the lead Development Partners will co-chair the Basket Steering Committee. The members accept that UNDP and DFID will serve in the role of lead Development Partners and co-chair of the Steering Committee.

10. The Steering Committee will meet at least once every two months, and more frequently at the request of any of the Committee members, and at least once a quarter will meet for the purpose of substantive and financial progress reporting. UNDP as Secretariat will be responsible for circulating the agendas and minutes of the Steering Committee.

Appendix III: Draft Terms of Reference for the

Programme Management Unit (PMU)

Capacity Building Programme for Sierra Leone Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper 2006-2007
Background
1. These Terms of Reference (hereinafter ‘TORs’) should be read alongside the Development Partners’ Memorandum of Understanding (hereinafter the ‘MOU’), the TORs for the Sierra Leone Basket Steering Committee (hereinafter ‘The Steering Committee’) and the UNDP Project Document on support to the Capacity Building Programme for the SL-PRSP.

2. Drawing on the lessons learnt from the management of donor support to electoral processes and other best practices, UNDP proposes to establish a dedicated Programme Management Unit (PMU) to manage the programme of support in all its dimensions. The strategy to establish a dedicated Unit is informed by the recognition that as Sierra Leone moves to a more long-term development process, government capacity to execute programmes must be reinforced through establishment of a NEX modality.
3. UNDP/MPPA-OP proposes to staff the Unit with the following core competencies:
a. Project Management
b. Senior Capacity Development Advisor
c. Finance Support
d. Programme/Operations Support

Summary of Principal Responsibilities
4. The functional responsibilities of the PMU would comprise the following broad categories:
a. set up joint financing procedure and manage UNDP-donor agreements;
b. substantive support to the capacity building programme
c. management, coordination and oversight of basket sub-programmes
d. procurement for the capacity building programme
e. financial management and audit

Specific responsibilities:
5. Substantive support to the capacity building programme: The PMU will:
a. Produce a new MOU among the basket members for the capacity building support programme.
b. Act as the Secretariat of the Steering Committee and provide substantive input, derived from best practices, in the strategic direction of the work of the Steering Committee
c. Provide substantive progress report, on a regular basis, to update the Basket donors on the status of the capacity building activities.
d. Provide strategic advice to the lead Development Partners on the capacity building programme in their engagement with the Government
i. Provide expert support to the capacity building activities in accordance with the benchmarks in the Development Partners MOU.

6. Financial Management and Audit: The PMU will:
a. Ensure timely disbursement of funds to all contracted partners as per agreed budget and disbursement schedules
b. Provide financial monitoring and guidelines to all contracted partners by collecting accounts, reports and receipts from the partner organisations.
c. Prepare regular financial summary narratives and consolidated accounts of the basket for circulation/presentation, together with the substantive progress report, to the Basket donors and the Steering Committee
d. Provide Terms of Reference and provide all necessary documentation for an audit of the Basket Fund, as well as prepare responses to audit observations and account examinations

7. Other Requirements:
a. General progress reporting: The PMU will use the regular monitoring reports from the various partners implementing activities to produce a quarterly technical progress report for discussion with the Basket Donors and at the Steering Committee. This will outline progress against the outcomes and benchmarks articulated in the project document.
b. The PMU will also provide regular substantive progress reports on the status of the capacity building programme, drawing attention to any key issues that would impact on planned activities.
c. Contract Approvals and Changes: The PMU will not authorise or conclude agreements with partner organisations without referral to the Basket Steering Committee.
d. Evaluation: The PMU will sub-contract consultants (or select donors outside the basket) to undertake an independent post-Basket evaluation
e. The PMU will act as a common information point for all implementing partners and basket stakeholders. It will take responsibility for circulating meeting reports and agendas.

8. Key Outputs by which Basket will assess performance:
a. Monitoring of technical and financial areas carried out regularly across range of implementing partners, quarterly reports from implementing partners received, quarterly financial summaries and progress reports provided to the Basket, stakeholder forum meetings as scheduled.
b. Coordination among all those parties involved in the Basket enhanced through regular meetings, and day-to-day answering of queries and liaison.
c. Independent evaluation of the Basket contracted in a timely and efficient manner

9. Timing: UNDP/MOPA will provide services to the Basket for duration of MOU this TOR is an addendum to.

10. Skills: UNDP/MPPA-OP will ensure that the PMU staff have the following key skills:
a. Technical expertise
b. Financial management expertise
c. Leadership and facilitation skills
d. Analytical skills
e. Information management

Photo: President Kabbah of Sierra Leone.

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